My View From The Country

Thank You, Moms Everywhere!

Motherhood is the backbone of our families and life.

Mother’s Day is Sunday. I’d love to write a fitting tribute to my mom, my wife, and all moms in general, but I don’t think I’m up to the task. How can you put such an appreciation into words?

Motherhood is the backbone of our families and life. I can’t begin to express how important my mom has been to our family, or how much my wife has influenced the lives of our kids. After all, moms take on so much of the responsibility of raising the kids and making the family thrive.

In defense of all us dads, I truly believe it’s not because we’re particularly lazy. To be truthful, I don’t think fathers enjoy that somehow mom is the one who always knows what’s really going on in the family, she provides the bulk of the nurturing of the children, or that she does more than her share of the work required to keep a household together. It’s simply that men are pragmatic. Moms are so much better at all that, that it’s simply impractical not to utilize that level of talent and commitment.

Photo Gallery: 65+ Photos That Celebrate Ranch Moms & Cowgirls

If someone had surveilled my house this week, they might question how mom helped edit the essay, played baseball with the kids, made student council election posters, ordered the phones, went to the track meet, ironed the FFA clothes, cooked the meals, worked full time, and helped get a couple hundred head of cows bred on the side. All I could tell such people is that: “Because no one but a mom could do it.”

For example, I’d gladly have helped make the posters, but I would have needed to know my daughter was running for office in the first place. Plus, my daughter never would have allowed my penmanship or artistic ability anywhere near her posters.

I know moms must get tired. They have one of the toughest and most important jobs in the world; they work incredible hours and get very little recognition for it. Yet, most of us have learned the meanings of love and sacrifice from our moms. I truly believe that my mom’s love helped create anything good I’ve ever done, and even enabled me to love my spouse, and my Savior. Perhaps we don’t thank the moms in our lives enough because it reminds us of a standard that we so often fail to meet.

I’m sure I can speak for a lot of guys who will celebrate this Mother’s Day thanking God for providing us with such a great mother, and such a great mother for our kids. On my desk is a notation I read every day; it says: “The most important thing a father can do for his children is to love their mother.”

I won’t speak for others, but while I’ve always loved my kids’ mother, I know I’ve often failed to treat her with the type of love she deserves. Hopefully, by Sunday, I’ll come up with a way to say thank you that truly reflects how thankful we all are for her.

Forgive me if I rely on Hallmark, bring breakfast in bed, try harder to be the one that gets the kids ready for church, and takes everyone out for lunch afterwards. Those little things seem so shallow in comparison to what moms do on a daily basis. But can one truly express their thankfulness for the second greatest gift that God ever gave us – a mom? To all those mothers out there, thanks for all you do!

 

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What's My View From The Country?

As a fulltime rancher, opinion contributor Troy Marshall brings a unique perspective on how consumer and political trends affect livestock production.

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Troy Marshall

Troy Marshall is a multi-generational rancher who grew up in Wheatland, WY, and obtained an Equine Science/Animal Science degree from Colorado State University where he competed on both the livestock...

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