BEEF Daily

Agriculture Was Green Before Green Was Cool

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earth_day_2010_tilt.png The American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) has promised to stop the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). AFBF President Bob Stallman told its members, “Our message to the new Congress is clear: It is time to stop the EPA. This pressure is a clear and present danger to American agriculture, and it's coming from one major source."

According to Stallman, greenhouse gas regulations, new rules on dust, and expansive new rules for water are some of the regulations that endanger agriculture. Read more about it here. I'm incredibly pleased with this strong message AFBF is sending, and I think one thing we can do to help this mission is to spread the positive word about agriculture and the environment.

After all, for cattlemen, every day is Earth Day, and we are the truly the first environmentalists. Here are a few talking points we can share today via Facebook, Twitter, email and one-on-one conversations about how green farming and ranching really is:

1. More than two-thirds of land used for grazing in the U.S. is not suitable for raising crops or urbanization.

2. More than 97% of U.S. beef cattle farms and ranches are classified as family farms.

3. Today’s American farmer feeds about 144 people worldwide.

4. If 1955 technology were used to produce the amount of beef raised today, 165 million more acres of land would be needed—that’s about the size of Texas!

5. According to the EPA, the entire U.S. agricultural sector accounts for only 4% of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions (GHG).

6. Methane from livestock accounts for only 2.6% of total U.S. GHG emissions.

What's BEEF Daily?

BEEF Daily Blog is produced by rancher Amanda Radke, one of the U.S. beef industry’s top social media “agvocates.”

Contributors

Amanda Radke

A fifth-generation rancher from Mitchell, SD, Amanda grew up on a purebred Limousin cattle operation in which she and husband Tyler are active. She graduated with a degree in agriculture journalism...

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