• Remove your very largest-framed cows and your smallest-framed cows to even up your herd with females that are more uniform. By doing this, you simply take the extreme ends off. You want to do the same with extreme-muscle cows and cows that don't have enough muscle.

  • Commercial producers should use one type of bull from one breed and one sire line. Pick a bull, any bull, but a bull of one breed — and stick with him. Many producers commonly use two or three breeds of bulls on a given set of cows. These random matings produce very non-uniform calf crops.

  • Select the type of bull that fits your goals based on his EPDs, and by visual indicators of frame size and muscling.

  • Try to make your calves' color uniform. Since perception and appearance sell most feeder cattle, it's important to have the calves colored as much alike as possible. And, if you set out to color them the same, by default you usually make carcass quality more uniform.

  • Gather as much data as possible on calf performance in feedlots and the packing house. The ultimate decisions concerning consistency and uniformity can only be made with data.