While you were despairing of getting your corn, soybeans, cotton, and rice out of the fields during the late summer/fall monsoons, some 60 million people were tending crops, livestock, and other of the myriad of enterprises, events, crop failures, and disasters in the virtual world of FarmVille.

From the dawn of the computer age, games have been a staple of the geeks who make computers run. In the process a lot of geeks founded software companies to make millions off the games.

But given the propensity of game developers toward rock ’em, sock ’em adventure, the mind boggles that in the four mos. since its introduction the most popular online computer game on the entire planet has been FarmVille.

While you were despairing of getting your corn, soybeans, cotton, and rice out of the fields during the late summer/fall monsoons, some 60 mil. people — from young kids to metropolitan sophisticates to senior citizens — were spending hours daily tending crops and livestock, and coping with the myriad of enterprises, crop failures, and other events in the virtual world of FarmVille.

And the game’s owners, a San Francisco startup company called Zynga, were raking in millions from advertising on the site and sales (for real money) of digital tractors, farmland, crops, livestock, and other assets. A 30-person staff is busily working to expand the game’s capabilities (and presumably, its profitability).

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