Was EPA Right In Denying RFS Waiver?

Last week, the Environmental Protection Agency denied a request to waive the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) mandate for the production of corn ethanol. This week’s online poll question is: “Was EPA correct in denying an RFS waiver?"

Vote in the poll and leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Discuss this poll 9

Anonymous
on Nov 30, 2012

The EPA along with the Dept of homeland security should be dissolved, just another case of bloated government.Adding ethanol has only raised the price of gas in our part of the country. We have no ethanol plants to get cattle feed products. Let ethanol stand on its own two feet.

Anonymous
on Nov 30, 2012

If ethanol is such a wonderful idea then let's end all government incentives to it and discontinue all mandates for it's use and see if it can stand on it's own feet. Only then will we know if it will ever be a viable product. Government requirement to produce and sell ANY volume of ANY product should be illegal!

Anonymous
on Nov 27, 2012

Ethanol demand has increased total feed supply by increasing acres planted and productions of distillers grain. As a beef producer I was pinched due to the droughts impact on forage supply, not corn prices. High feed prices are due to an extreme drought, not ethanol. All users have suffered. Without ethanol we would have a smaller feed supply, and still be in a drought...causing feed prices to be even worse than they are now.

Anonymous
on Nov 27, 2012

I raise more cow $'s than corn $'s but the reality is - #1 right or wrong the EPA says we need an oxygenate and ethanol is an appropriate one for a variety of reasons. #2 There is NO active "tax supported incentives" for ethanol production. #3 at this stage (we can argue about the past) the Market IS telling the fuel industry what to do, ethanol is cheaper than gas so they are using it, #4 PLEASE PLEASE lets not become the "anti modern AG" critics and ignore current well researched science, - ethanol in it's current production system - including all it's inputs IS a very good NET producer of transportation energy. That DOES NOT mean its as efficient as pulling oil out of the ground calorie for calorie but see #1. We're not producing ethanol using the same technology as the 1980's - it IS "paying for itself" both financially and from a BTU standpoint.
The VERY vast majority of folks who raise cows also raise corn, both sides of the discussion are part of the 'family 'of AG.
Folks - no matter what part of AG we align ourselves with, our BIGGEST concern - no matter how close you are to going in the red, is the fact that we producers are not in control of our collective industry. We cannot work together to build a strong Agriculture to feed the world and employ our kids if we pit one part of the industry against another.
And remember I have to buy a lot more corn than I raise.

Anonymous
on Nov 27, 2012

I agree 100 percent.

Anonymous
on Nov 27, 2012

One agency EPA should not have control of the economic well being of our country. We need a balanced approach for use of grains. Use for ethanol when we have low priced corn and reduce use when prices hit a target level. This would also protect corn producers and we could reduce subsides this would help balance the budget.

Anonymous
on Nov 27, 2012

As with virtually all topics today, this issue is politicized when in reality the free market should be the ruling factor.

Anonymous
on Nov 23, 2012

Ethanol is not the answer to our energy or environmental problems. Meanwhile the Renewable Fuels Act distorts the corn market and places livestock producers at a competitive disadvantage.

Anonymous
on Nov 23, 2012

After accounting for the energy to plant, fertilize, spray, irrigate, harvest, haul, process and delivery ethanol, there is precious little if any energy gain. In addition why to we keep insisting in developing economic dependencies instead of letting the market tell us what really ought to happen?

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