Pfizer Animal Genetics Announces Donation to the American Angus Foundation

Portions of defect test sales will go to fund youth activities

MADISON, N.J. — Nov. 2, 2010 — Pfizer Animal Genetics will donate $2 for every Contractural Arachnodactyly (CA) test run on registered Angus animals from now through the end of the year to the American Angus Foundation. Donations resulting from tests recorded through the American Angus Association, and processed by Pfizer Animal Genetics, will be made to help support the association’s youth activities fund.

Phil Trowbridge, chairman, American Angus Foundation, says this donation will help maintain and grow Angus programs.

“The American Angus Foundation is an important investment in the future of our breed and the industry because it provides support for both youth activities and research,” Trowbridge says. “The foundation has supplied more than $1 million in scholarships, and this donation will help us continue down this road. It is important for us to have partnerships like this, and we greatly appreciate the charitable support for the Vision of Value campaign from Pfizer Animal Genetics.”

Scott Bormann, North American business director, Pfizer Animal Genetics, says that, with this donation, producers can effectively identify CA in their herd and contribute to future accomplishments in the Angus breed.

“We are committed to providing beef producers with the most advanced technologies while being a responsible partner who gives back and supports the future of the industry,” Bormann says. “By contributing toward Angus youth, we hope to help our future leaders take the industry to the next level.”

Pfizer Animal Genetics released a commercial version of the CA test earlier this month. Originally developed by Dr. Jon Beever at the University of Illinois and the American Angus Association (AAA), test results will be provided to the applicable association(s) at the request of the breeder providing the DNA sample.

CA is a nonlethal genetic condition that affects isolated lines of Angus and Angus-influenced cattle. While CA-affected calves are born alive, and most can walk, suckle and survive, their upper limb joints (particularly hip, stifle and hock) have a reduced range of motion. Calves appear normal when they reach 4 to 6 months of age, but most perform poorly and are relatively tall and slender, with compromised feet and leg conformation.

Producers should visit www.pfizeranimalgenetics.com for order forms and a sample collection guide, and to view ongoing updates and answers to frequently asked questions about CA testing. Additional questions may be answered by Customer Service at 877-BEEF DNA (877-233-3362).

About Pfizer Animal Genetics

Pfizer Animal Genetics is a business unit of Pfizer Animal Health, a world leader in discovering and developing innovative animal vaccines and prescription medicines. Pfizer Inc. is the world’s largest research-based pharmaceutical company.

About Pfizer Animal Health

Pfizer Animal Health, a business of Pfizer Inc., is a world leader in discovering and developing innovative animal vaccines and prescription medicines, investing an estimated $300 million annually in animal health product research and development. For more information about how Pfizer Animal Health works to ensure a safe, sustainable global food supply from healthy livestock and poultry; or helps companion animals and horses to live longer, healthier lives, visit www.PfizerAH.com.

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