Cattle Industry Awards

Harlan Hughes honored with 2004 IRM Achievement Award. BEEF magazine columnist Harlan Hughes is the recipient of the 2004 Integrated Resource Management (IRM) Achievement Award. Announced at January's Cattle Industry Annual Convention in Phoenix, AZ, the award recognizes lifetime contributions toward the IRM management concept.

Hughes retired in 2000 as Extension livestock economist at NDSU, where he initiated and administered the IRM program for the Northern Plains for the previous decade. Hughes now lives in Laramie, WY, and pens the BEEF magazine monthly column, “Market Advisor,” in addition to consulting and lecturing across the U.S. and Canada on cow-calf business management.

Anne and Tobin Armstrong, Kingsville, TX, received the National Cattlemen's Beef Association's (NCBA's) Swan Family Leadership Award. The award recognizes worthy individuals who have made a difference during a lifetime of dedication and leadership to the beef industry.

Anne is a former U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain whose lifetime in public service has helped her country and the cattle industry. Tobin, manager and partner of Armstrong Ranch, also has been a lifelong contributor toward programs and efforts that have benefited the Texas and U.S. cattle industry.

The award honors individuals who exemplify the commitment and leadership of the Swan family of Idaho and Utah. Bill Swan served as National Cattlemen's Association president in 1981. Son George served as NCBA president in 1999.

Albert Conlin, owner/operator of Conlin Supply Company in Oakdale, CA, is the 2003 NCBA Top Hand Club Champion. Conlin recruited a record 163 new members to NCBA.

Runner-up was J.D. Fitzpatrick, an order buyer from Winchester, KY. He was Top Hand Champion for two consecutive years, and recruited 52 new members in 2003.

California Ranch wins national Environmental Stewardship Award. Elaine and George Work, owners of Work Family Ranch, are winners of the 2004 Environmental Stewardship Award.

Established in 1991 by the NCBA and sponsored by Dow AgroSciences and the Natural Resources Conservation Service, the program recognizes cattle producers whose stewardship practices are inventive, cost-effective and contribute to environmental conservation.

Nestled in the Cholame Hills of Central California, the Work Family Ranch is a fourth-generation, cow-calf and stocker operation. The Works have been involved extensively with various conservation groups. The partnerships have helped fund such ranch improvements as ground-level troughs that not only provide livestock water but service the needs of wildlife.

Other conservation projects include ground squirrel disease research, conservation/no till methods, windmills to help distribute water, no-till planting, leaving some grain crops for wildlife, and other habitat improvements like crushing brush using hay and some hungry cattle.

Jean Berney, Okanogan, WA, is American National CattleWomen's (ANCW) Outstanding CattleWoman of the Year for 2003. The award is given to a cattlewoman who has excelled at continued beef promotion on the local, state and national level, while contributing dedication, commitment and support to ANCW. The award is sponsored by Bayer Animal Health.

An active member and leader at her county level, Berney served on the Cattlemen's Beef Board, the committee for the National Beef Cook-Off®, and represented ANCW on several committees, including Joint Public Relations, Nutrition and Health, and Industry Communications.

Berney and husband Buzz run a family ranch in the foothills of the Eastern Cascade Mountains in north-central Washington.

Henry Gardiner, an Ashland, KS, Angus cow-calf producer, is the recipient of the Beef Industry Vision Award. Presented by the National Cattlemen's Foundation, the award is sponsored by Ford Motor Company and recognizes individuals whose innovation has been incorporated into their operation and has enhanced their business and the cattle industry overall.

Nominees are evaluated on the basis of effective use of technology, impact on production costs, ingenuity of implementation, innovative marketing, impact on the industry and optimum resource management.

Gardiner was cited for his work with Iowa State University's Richard Willham in developing an accurate Angus genetic evaluation. It's regarded as a key to the development of the Angus breed in the U.S., the constant improvement of which allowed the breed to become one of the world's major beef breeds.

Convention News

Jan Lyons, Manhattan, KS, is the new president of the NCBA. She is a rancher from the Flint Hills. More on Lyons can be found in the January issue of BEEF on page 14.

Other NCBA officers include Jim McAdams, TX, president-elect; Mike John, MO, vice president. Bob Rolston, CO, federation division chairman; Myron Williams, SD, federation division vice chairman; Mike Byrne, CA, policy division chairman; and Rob Hendry, WY, policy division vice chairman.

NCBA members voted to restore power on policy decisions back to the rank-and-file membership. The move required a bylaws change, which was approved by both the NCBA board of directors and the organization's members.

The bylaws change ensures NCBA members an official policy ballot in the February issue of the Beef Business Bulletin. The ballot includes all new and amended policy passed by the NCBA board and its members present at the meeting.

For the mail ballot to be valid, at least 20% of the membership must vote, and there must be a 20% return rate from four of the seven NCBA regions. The latter stipulation is to prevent a single region from dominating the election process, NCBA says.

For the third year in a row, Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman addressed attendees at the Cattle Industry Annual Convention. She announced the Bush administration's proposal to increase its commitment to prevent BSE by $47 million in fiscal year (FY) 2005. This increases the budget to $60 million for activities designed to prevent BSE in the U.S., a 377% increase over FY 2004.

The funding, Veneman said, would be used for accelerated development of a national animal identification (ID) system, the collection of 40,000 samples and tests for BSE at rendering plants and on farms, advanced research and development of BSE testing technologies, monitoring compliance of regulations for specified risk materials and advanced meat recovery.

The Cattlemen's Beef Board (CBB) elected Nelson Curry, Paris, KY, as chairman. Curry is a farm manager of Clay Charolais, a 2,200-acre, intensive-grazing beef operation. The farm runs 1,500 stocker steers annually.

Additional board members include Alan Svajgr, Cozad, NE, serving as vice chairman; and Jay O'Brien, Amarillo, TX, serving as secretary/treasurer.

Susie Magnuson is the 53rd president of the American National CattleWomen (ANCW). Susie and husband Ted farm and feed cattle northwest of Eaton, CO. They have two sons, Tim and Jim.

Magnuson is a past president of the Colorado CattleWomen and has been a member of the ANCW Board of Directors and a member of the ANCW Executive Committee since 1995. For the past two years, she's served as a member of NCBA's International Markets Committee and a board member of NCBA's Federation Division.

The Beefmobile was unveiled to beef producers at the Cattle Industry Annual Convention and Tradeshow in Phoenix. The goal of the Beefmobile is to reach out to grassroots producers to help them understand the benefits of the checkoff program, and to consumers about information about beef and beef products.

The Beefmobile will make stops at 100 livestock marketing facilities and 100 retail stores across the U.S. Coordination and promotion of the Beefmobile is handled by the National Livestock Producers Association, Colorado Springs, CO.

Making a commitment to enhancing educational programming for U.S. cattle producers, Pfizer Animal Health announced a $3-million donation over the next three years to the National Cattlemen's Foundation.

Robert DiMarzo, president of U.S. operations for Pfizer Animal Health, says the intent is for Pfizer's grant to be used for educational programs for producers that “reach beyond the meetings.” He says there are no stipulations on how the money is to be invested but adds that he envisions enhancements to programs like the long-sponsored Pfizer Cattlemen's Colleges and NCBA Industry Issues Forums to reach a broader grassroots audience of cattlemen — those who don't generally attend the meetings where such discussions are presented.