A higher intake of meat during middle age may prevent a future decline in activities of daily living (ADL) among the elderly, a new study by Kyoto Women’s University (Japan) has found.

Researchers examined the association of meat, fish and egg consumption to determine if a risk of mortality and future ADL among the elderly existed. This cohort study was made up of 2,316 randomly selected Japanese individuals that were 47-60 years of age in a 19-year period beginning in 1980.

During the study, some of the study’s participants were documented in having impairment to their ADL, resulting in some form of a dependency. This dependency was not observed in participants that consumed meat. In fact, a statistically significant decrease in ADL impairment was reported for participants that consumed a higher intake of meat. Interestingly, the researchers found no differences associated with participants that consumed fish and egg proteins. None of the three foods were associated with any changes in mortality.

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