Normally the Torrington Livestock Market sells about 3,500 head of cattle in May. This year, it sold more than 18,000, says Michael Schmitt, one of the market’s owners. In June, it normally moves about 1,800. This year, it sold more than 17,000 head.

The dry weather is forcing ranchers across Wyoming to sell cattle months earlier than normal because there isn’t grass to feed the animals, Schmitt says. The weather could have a lasting impact on agriculture in the state, as well as future prices for beef, he says.

The company is up about 32,000 head from a year ago at this time, Schmitt says.

A recent video auction in Torrington sold 30,000 head, a number not particularly high for this time of year. What was different was the delivery date of the cattle sold. Normally at this time, ranchers plan to deliver the cattle in August or September, now most are shipping out in July, Schmitt says.

To see the full article, click here.Normally the Torrington Livestock Market sells about 3,500 head of cattle in May. This year, it sold more than 18,000, says Michael Schmitt, one of the market’s owners. In June, it normally moves about 1,800. This year, it sold more than 17,000 head.

The dry weather is forcing ranchers across Wyoming to sell cattle months earlier than normal because there isn’t grass to feed the animals, Schmitt says. The weather could have a lasting impact on agriculture in the state, as well as future prices for beef, he says.

The company is up about 32,000 head from a year ago at this time, Schmitt says.

A recent video auction in Torrington sold 30,000 head, a number not particularly high for this time of year. What was different was the delivery date of the cattle sold. Normally at this time, ranchers plan to deliver the cattle in August or September, now most are shipping out in July, Schmitt says.

To see the full article, click here.