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What Are Bred Heifer Prices In Your Neck Of The Woods?

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Are you expanding your cow herd this year? If so, what are bred heifer and cow prices in your area?

In addition to weaning, preg-checking and harvest, fall is a busy time for cattle sales. I’ve been to a few sales in the last couple of weeks, and it has been interesting to be in the stands and take notes on the highs and lows of these sales.

At the sales I've attended this fall, I’ve seen bred heifers sell anywhere from the going market price to more than $10,000. Commercial cows have been selling for top dollar, and even matching the price levels of some purebred seedstock. It makes me think that folks are definitely thinking expansion.

I'm in the buying market myself this year as my family is looking to expand our cowherd. A couple of factors we're watching in our area of South Dakota are how the cattle losses suffered by some ranchers in early October's winter storm Atlas will impact the price of bred heifers, and whether cheaper feed prices will encourage more livestock producers to hang on to their cattle.

From what I can gather, prices are following the same trend we have seen in the last couple of years as cow numbers declined across the country. However, I think that an increase in herd dispersals due to aging ranchers exiting the business provides an opportunity for some young producers to snatch up some great breeding stock - if they are so inclined and have access to the required capital. The latter one can be a huge hurdle in today's ag economy.

There are certainly a lot of factors that go into predicting the cost of bred females, and I speculate that prices might be a little softer this winter. Of course, I’m no expert; I’m just basing this prediction from what I’ve seen so far. Think of this blog post as just coffee talk.

Help me out in this discussion. What are the prices of bred heifers in your neck of the woods? What are the factors in your area impacting those prices? What are your predictions for bred heifer and cow prices going into the winter? Leave your thoughts in the comments section below.

 

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Discuss this Blog Entry 22

Anonymous (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

very disappointed in content. I clicked on the article looking forward to a detailed account of bred heifer prices and instead its just general B.S. we already know. too bad.

stan (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

Post-weaning, it costs me about $40 /month to raise, breed and keep a heifer until calving. This means that a 21 month old ,1000#, 6 months preg checked heifer is worth $700 more than she was at worth at 7month weighing 550. To me that means $1500. I raise my own replacements as I can't find equal quality for less. As a side note, I haven't pulled but one calf out of the last 58 heifers and that one only needed a little help. Who knows what problems bought heifers will have.

Anonymous (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

Bred heifers $1000 - $1500

Anonymous (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

1400 to 1500 per head in the east texas area

Anonymous (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

$1400 to $1500 in the east Texas area

Meadows Ranch (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

Good morning, I went to a replacement sale two weeks ago. I didn't stay through the entire sale but did see several groups of black heifers sell. Long bred were bringing $1900.00 tops with a group of first calf pairs bringing $2400.00. This was the top price that I saw, so some were cheaper, but not too much.
The dry weather has affected the numbers that we can support because of the grass and pond water. Fertilizer prices have affected how much we spread and many people spray for weeds and don't fertilize. This will eventually weaken our pastures more. The high feed prices of the last couple of years hasn't helped any. It is down somewhat this year because of the bumper crop of corn in the corn belt.
I have to get to work. Thanks for your articles.
David Meadows

Frank Schlichting (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

One only has to look at the prices culls are selling for to see where the floor is at. Since most of them are selling for around $ 1,000 there there aren't going to be any bred stock for less than that.

Anonymous (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

$1200-2500 in South Carolina, depending on age and whether the heifers are purebred or commercial

Anonymous (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

Here in VA bred heifers are bringing $1500-$1900 for good commercial angus cross heifers

A Vega (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

I agree with comment #1, more than an article, this is a request for information.

Anonymous (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

1500-1950 for good commercial angus cross bred heifers here in VA

Anonymous (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

Thanks to those who shared information as suggested.

on Nov 12, 2013

I'm selling my bred two-year old Belties for $2200....most Angus and Herefords are going for at least $1800 too. I agree that there is a "hidden" expansion going on in many parts of the industry that hasn't made the "press" yet.

BTW: Thanks Amanda for all you do to get the info out to us ;o)

Magnolia Farm (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

We are raising our own replacements because we cull every year for pregnancy and temperament. Our heifers are docile, good mommas, never miss a meal at weaning and produce good calves. The few times we have bought replacements at sales the temperament didn't fit our herd and over a few years we ended up selling most of them. When we sold calves in October we saw similar bred replacments selling in the range of $1,700 - $2,000 most in the four month bred range. And I would add my thanks Amanda for the good job you do to get info out to us! And I appreciate others posting their comments on this too.

Magnolia Farm (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

I would also add there seem to be a lot of folks in our area (East MS/West AL) looking for good heifers... when we sold our steers, the first question from everyone was did we bring the heifers to sell.

Thanks again!

DavVictor (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

$950 - $1200 East TN (Mixed breed, Commercial)

Kit (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

Check out www.Heifer.PRO for up to date prices and numbers on bred heifers.

Rich VW (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

Fancy bred heifers at several recent livestock auction marts have topped $2300. Many selling in the $1800 to $2200 range. It appears some expansion, or her rebuidling is occuring.

Linda (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

We just had a British White cattle sale in southern Minnesota with breeders from the American British White Park Association and BWCAA (same breed of cattle, different associations) and the average bred heifer price was $2335 with the top one selling at $2800. These are common prices for this awesome heritage breed of cattle. They should have gone for more, but hay is scarce in Minnesota.

jg_80 (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

We just sold 55 head for $2000 per head off the ranch private treaty.

Eric (not verified)
on Nov 12, 2013

Recent Red Angus sale - Neb. saw commercials in the $2400-$3100 range - I was shocked! Locally - Ia. - $1500-$2000 for the few we have had time to see. I think they will work up as harvest winds down. Ample hay this year with a lot of corn stalks being baled. Early snow could change that.

Anonymous (not verified)
on Nov 14, 2013

Sold 6month old calves off the cows for around $1200 average and bought back yearling heifers bred for spring for around the same money in Ontario Canada

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BEEF Daily Blog is produced by rancher Amanda Radke, one of the U.S. beef industry’s top social media “agvocates.”

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Amanda Radke

A fifth-generation rancher from Mitchell, SD, Amanda grew up on a purebred Limousin cattle operation in which she and husband Tyler are active. She graduated with a degree in agriculture journalism...

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