BEEF Daily

Temple Grandin Addresses South Dakota Cattlemen

RSS

img_1926.JPG Last Thursday, I traveled to Humboldt, S.D. to the farm site of S.D. Secretary of Agriculture Bill Even to listen to Dr. Temple Grandin speak. While at the farm, Grandin talked to producers about best animal handling practices, and following her presentation, she walked the crowd through Secretary Even's facilities and showed us places where he could improve the work sight. I had the opportunity to interview Dr. Grandin for BEEF Daily. I hope you'll take a minute to hear what she has to say about livestock handlers and animal behavior. Thanks, Dr. Grandin, for the interview!

img_1913.JPGDr. Grandin is a designer of livestock handling facilities and a professor of animal science at Colorado State University. Facilities she has designed are located in the United States, Canada, Europe, Mexico, Australia, New Zealand, and other countries. In North America, almost half of the cattle are handled in a center track restrainer system that she designed for meat plants. Curved chute and race systems she has designed for cattle are used worldwide and her writings on the flight zone and other principles of grazing animal behavior have helped many people to reduce stress on thier animals during handling.

BEEF Daily Quick Fact: 5 tips for best livestock handling: 1) Move small groups of animals. 2) DO NOT overcrowd crowd pen - fill it only half full. 3) Handlers should understand the basic concepts of flight zone and point of balance. 4) Ranches and facilities must have non-slip flooring. 5) Keep animals calm. Calm and quiet animals move more easily. (Source: Temple Grandin)

What's BEEF Daily?

BEEF Daily Blog is produced by rancher Amanda Radke, one of the U.S. beef industry’s top social media “agvocates.”

Contributors

Amanda Radke

A fifth-generation rancher from Mitchell, SD, Amanda grew up on a purebred Limousin cattle operation in which she and husband Tyler are active. She graduated with a degree in agriculture journalism...

Sponsored Introduction Continue on to (or wait seconds) ×