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Dodge Ram Super Bowl Ad Gets Mixed Reviews

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A Super Bowl ad celebrating America’s farmers earns two distinctly different reactions from the agricultural community.

For the millions of Americans who watched Super Bowl XLVII on Sunday night, the buzz on Monday morning was about the Baltimore Raven’s big win, the power outage at the start of the second half, Beyonce’s acrobatic half-time performance, the Destiny’s Child reunion, the vocal artistry of Jennifer Hudson and Alicia Keyes, a showdown between the two head coaches (who just happen to be brothers), and don’t forget the food!

And, in between commercials for Doritos, Coke, M&Ms and Budweiser, there was one commercial that aired that made everyone shut up and listen.

The Dodge Ram brand has declared 2013 “The Year Of The Farmer” and it employed a riveting commentary about agriculture as part of a Super Bowl ad spot that grabbed viewers’ attention. It was a recording of Paul Harvey’s 35-year-old poem, “So God Made A Farmer,” which was voiced over photographs of farmers and ranchers living and working in their everyday lives.

Harvey, who died in 2009, was known for his broadcasting catchphrase, “the rest of the story,” and he recited the poem at the 1978 National FFA Convention. You can listen to the poem in its entirety in the video clip above, but here’s an excerpt of that poem:

“And on the eighth day, God looked down on his planned paradise and said, ‘I need a caretaker.’ So God made a farmer.”

The commercial ends with, “To the farmer in all of us. Guts, Glory, Ram.”

After the commercial aired, I felt a chill run up my spine, and I wiped away a stray tear as I realized millions of Americans had just watched the first real commercial of the evening. It wasn’t a hilarious take on why you should eat Doritos, drink Budweiser or hire GoDaddy.com to build your website. Instead, it was a serious conversation about the less than 2% of Americans who risk it all to be in production agriculture. I couldn’t have asked for a better commercial to be aired during a more perfect time on network television.

Even better, Ram is encouraging folks to watch, share and support the video. For every view and share, the Ram brand makes a donation, up to $1 million worth, to support FFA and assist in local hunger and educational programs. Does it get any better than that?

However, some in agriculture are displeased with the commercial. Using the words of the late Paul Harvey, I will give you “the rest of the story.”

My Facebook and Twitter feeds were on fire yesterday as word started spreading that Harvey, known for his soothing and halting radio voice, was also a vocal animal rights activist. In fact, just a decade ago, many agriculture publications were urging folks to turn off the radio whenever Harvey’s broadcast came on.

In addition, many are frustrated that Harvey is now a spokesperson for American agriculture and are choosing not to support Ram’s 2013 endorsement of the American farmer and the FFA. This, in my eyes, is a colossal mistake.

We are missing the forest for the trees!

Sure, I’m no stranger to standing up against animal rights activists, and this wouldn’t be the first time that FFA got mixed up with one. Remember in 2006 when Carrie Underwood, who is a Humane Society of the U.S. (HSUS) supporter and vegan, was invited to sing at the National FFA Convention? Well, as a high school student, I led the charge to boycott that concert, and more than 1,000 of us students stood up for animal agriculture and walked out of the concert hall when Underwood took the stage. Looking back, I realize it was an important thing to do to educate folks about HSUS and to encourage folks to be careful where they spend their money. The silver lining of that concert was the opening act of Jason Aldean, today a country superstar, who sang his hit song, “Amarillo Sky,” a chart-topping tribute to the American farmer.

But, I digress. This situation may seem similar, but we also have to see the positive side of this commercial. Sure, Harvey was an animal rights activist, but at one point in his career, he openly celebrated American agriculture. And, don’t you think it’s a kick to have an animal welfare sympathizer actually speaking up on behalf of agriculture in this commercial?

And, isn’t explaining our way of life a common goal we all share in agriculture today? Don’t we constantly preach to each other about using social media to share our stories? We try to educate folks, so that the vegans and vegetarians might douse their torches, drop their pitchforks, and try bacon again. And also so that the remaining 95% of Americans, who are unsure about what to believe, learn and accept that farmers and ranchers are people they can trust to tend to the animals, care for the land, and raise a safe food product.

Doesn’t this commercial accomplish exactly that?

I don’t care whether you buy a Dodge truck in 2013 or not. And, I don’t believe that loving this commercial and what it stands for, or the message it sends to our consumer, means that you are sympathetic to a guy like Harvey, who was an activist at heart. Frankly, I think bringing up bad things about a man who is no longer around to defend himself is in poor taste.

Perhaps the most important thing to note is that most Americans don’t even realize what political ties Harvey favored in his spare time. Instead, they remember him as the charming man on the radio, who signed off each daily segment with that familiar, “Paul Harvey. Good day.”

So, instead of getting into an uproar about the behind-the-scenes drama of this commercial, let’s focus on the important things. My takeaway is that 111.3 million people watched the Super Bowl on Sunday, and those viewers spent a couple of minutes of the big show learning about who we are in American agriculture.

God made a farmer to do the job so many are unable and unwilling to do. I’m darn proud to be one in this elite group of folks, and I thank you for your hard work in being a part of it, as well. Drama aside, this commercial is agricultural advocacy at its finest. I’m going to watch it, share it, support the FFA, and be thankful that we got such amazing exposure on TV this weekend. Will you do the same?

Discuss this Blog Entry 95

on Feb 4, 2013

Outstanding piece, Amanda. One of your best, in my opinion, and I greatly appreciate your commentary and objective view while clearly identifying the best of what the commercial represents. Nothing to complain about there, folks...that was a multi-million dollar Ad for what YOU do:)

Brittany Mountjoy (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

I completely agree. This piece was excellent and completely balanced- and maybe exactly what needed to be said.

Lory Greer (not verified)
on Feb 4, 2013

Amanda, I thoroughly agree with your comments.

Anonymous (not verified)
on Feb 4, 2013

AND THE NON-GOD LOVERS WILL HATE THIS PIECE OF BRILLIANCE. IT'S ABOUT FARMERS STUPID!!!
TOM

Anonymous (not verified)
on Feb 6, 2013

What does that mean? Are you saying all "non-God lovers" don't like farmers. Ridiculous.

Anonymous (not verified)
on Feb 4, 2013

In 09 HSUS beat you to the punch of praising their star http://hsus.typepad.com/wayne/2009/03/paul-harvey.html
When one writes for a living they must appeal to the masses instead of doing the right thing. Way to wait until the end of the day to weigh in. Way to cower instead of doing the right thing. Way to identify your self with the AR movement. Did you especially like the line of watching the foal die? Would you still support it if Wayne Pacelle was the orator?

Blaine (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

The line about the foal dying was not a celebration of animal cruelty, but perfect imagry intended to tug on the heartstrings, or wax nostalgic, for those who have indeed worked in animal agriculture and have experienced losing a newborn animal and the sorrow that comes with it. And no, not just an animal for work or food. That may at times be the end result but there is not a cattlemen out there who doesn't feel a connection, perhaps even a sense of love or maternal/paternal protectionism, for a newborn calf.

Wayne Pacelle would NEVER be the oratorof a commercial like this, and that's the point. He and Paul Harvey are entirely different personalities.

Your post is ridiculous, and being Anonymous simply adds to the lack of credibility.

Kristin Dewey (not verified)
on Feb 6, 2013

Well said Bruce! Many times, my dad brought in a brand new baby calf to lay them in front of the kitchen propane stove because they were unfortunate to be born in the middle of a snowstorm. Many times I have watched him and helped him as he tried to get the calf to start eating/moving/breathing; even mimicking the licking by the momma cow by stroking the calf with a wet towel. How many times have I watched him put a feeding tube down the calf's throat to force milk into the stomach? How many times have I seen this work, and sometimes not work at all? Too many. Doing all of this without thinking that this is inhumane, but trying to save a baby calf that was born in a world of unfair chances and bad weather at times. I've watched him cry over losing the calf. I've watched him smile looking out at his herd and seeing the baby calf that he and I nursed back to health. So no, most of the time it's not just an animal for work or food.

Mallster (not verified)
on Feb 6, 2013

well said Blaine

cabrahamzon (not verified)
on Feb 4, 2013

I smiled as I read the Underwood walkout reminder! As usual you are spot-on here Amanda and as usual I am so proud to stand with you!

Anonymous (not verified)
on Feb 4, 2013

Great piece, "The Forest for the Trees", excellent point.

Anonymous (not verified)
on Feb 4, 2013

Awesome commercial that wasn't even paid for by ag dollars. Thumbs up to dodge. Maybe the secretary of ag now understands what is relevant about agriculture.

Craig Foster (not verified)
on Feb 4, 2013

Thank you for your positive comments Amanda. Though I am not a farmer now, I grew up on a farm in northwest Illinois and I am a former member of the FFA. I have passed the commericial on to family and freinds.

Anonymous (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

Well done! Long live Paul Harvey and long live the American farmer. I was moved to tears as well. We owe those people so much.

Gus (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

AMANDA,
The reported audience was around 180,000,000 as reported here in Kansas City which was a record. I commend you on your response to those close-minded, "past" ridden constituents among us that really don't get the "big" picture. We can try to boycott everything that is against us, but the best way to "turn the tide" is through education, transparency, and how we carry ourselves in the "heat of the battle".The "agenda" of Wayne Pacelle and HSUS is being exposed more every day. As farm folks, we owe Dodge a big "thank'you" for pointing out and recognizing the importance of the 2% of us that are responsible for feeding the world! This household thought it was the TOP ad of the evening although my wife wants to go out an buy a Clydsdale colt!
Keep up the good fight! Gus

AnonymousKathy Limberg (not verified)
on Feb 6, 2013

Instead of digging into the past about what someone did or said years ago, let us support Dodge, who paid a big price to honor the American Farmers. They showed so many different kinds of farmers and did it so gracefully. I was very honored to be a farmer and could hardly believe what I was hearing and seeing in such a big event as the Super Bowl. Please give thanks where thanks is due.

Steve Lucas (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

"So God made a cowboy," would have fit the choice of pictures better.

Charlie Kraus (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

Small minds talk about people.
Mediocre minds talk about events.
Great minds talk about ideas.

Would Paul Harvey's words have been any more or less true if the had been voiced by someone all could agree upon?

Anonymous (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

Great article Amanda.
It's hard to believe that you received negative feedback from Ag folks. This was a great ad. We need to applaud Dodge Ram for this. I think the positive view presented of Farmers and "Cowboys" is immeasurable. Paul Harvey was at one time one of my favorites to listen to while in the field. When I found out what his views were concerning animal "rights" it was easy to just change the radio dial before his broadcast came on.

Mark Moenning (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

That was the only commercial of the evening. Clearly, Dodge wants to tie their product to our reputation and dedication to America, let's embrace it. Dodge could have chosen fluzzy Hollywood celeb's but they chose real people. The poem and the distinctive and recognizable voice speaks for itself.
Mark

Blaine (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

AMEN!!!!!

Bob Neese (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

When I read the header, "Superbowl ad gets mixed reviews", I had to see your "rest of the story". I couldn't imagine...who would not love that ad? And what farmer or rancher could watch and listen to that without at least a lump in his throat, and likely more than just a "stray" tear?
I get it that the HSUS sycophant(sicko) that boldly posted here as "anonymous" would not like this ad at all. That post is rather telling as to the power of this ad.
Your informing us of fellow agriculturalists negativity toward this ad was the first negative thing I had seen. But it seems our little groups within the agricultural family have a penchant for shooting ourselves in the foot.
On Facebook and in conversation yesterday it seemed it was a favorite for most everyone.... city and country alike. Youngsters don't know who Paul Harvey was, oldsters such as myself are largely unaware of his politics, but appreciated his unique style, his stories, and "the rest of the story", that so often inspired. And with this, Paul Harvey's poem and Dodge's orchestration and millions of dollars did more for the farmer and rancher than we have probably done for ourselves in years.

Anonymous (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

Great job Amanda. I'm a little happier now to be driving a Dodge Ram even though Chrysler took a bailout.

Anonymous (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

I thought it a pretty good commercial, a little too heavy on the rancher and not farmer, but the thought was there. Then the stinkin' hog factory at the end kind of made me sigh, buy hey, I'm just a cattleman and live surrounded by hog factories (and I was here first for those of you who think that is "farming" !)

JMJLaurent (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

I agree Amanda. When someone throws a parade in your honor, smile and wave and THANK THEM from the bottom of your very humbled heart. Don't rain on your own parade! Proud owner of three Dodge Ram Pickups that serve our farm well.

W.E. (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

Did you notice that this commercial celebrates the way farming used to be, not the way it is now? Paul Harvey, as you pointed out, wrote his piece thirty-five years ago, about the time we started farming. Did God make the farmer to work in a long windowless building where tens of thousands of chickens—whose breasts are so heavy that they can barely walk—spend their short lives without ever seeing the sun, to carry out the dead ones by the dozen every day to the incinerator? No, I don't think so. I'm a farmer who has no choice but to breathe the stench in the air from the eight huge chicken houses a half mile across the field. I'm a farmer who feels grief for the young family members who work there, who have chained themselves through a million dollars of debt to that life of slavery to the corporations that capitalize on their efforts. I'm a farmer who believes there should be more of us out here raising good food on the land, where cows can eat grass and chickens can scratch for bugs in the pasture behind the cows, living the way they were really made to live, doing the good they were made to do on the earth, leaving their manure behind to feed the microbes in the soil. I’m a farmer who has watched our neighbors die off, their homes abandoned and torn down, their barns blown away in tornadoes, their woodlots and orchards bulldozed and burned to grow more and more acres of corn and soybeans.
Call me an animal rights activist if you want to, but I believe animals really do have rights to be what they are and do what they are made to do. Cooping up 50,000 calves in a feedlot where they eat no grass is not farming. It is industrialism. Even Henry Ford realized, when he was an old man, that taking the children of impoverished farmers off the farm and putting them into his assembly lines to manufacture cars for wages wasn't caretaking. We need better ways. It’s time to put more farmers back on the land that Earl Butz kicked them off of during the 1980s, when he made food a weapon and told us to get big or get out. We refused to get out, and we are not big, and it has not been easy hanging on in this world of industrial farming where everyone thinks the mac and cheese in the blue box is real food, and that all food should be as cheap as it is in the superstore that advertises “Always the low price. Always.” Yes, we get milk for our family from a single Jersey cow. How many farmers do that nowadays? We raise our beef from Herefords grown to finish entirely on grass and sell it to our neighbors. We grow vegetables in a garden fertilized with composted cow manure and fruit trees nourished with the rinse water from our milk pail. We have had to take extra jobs to afford health insurance, electricity, trucks, fuel, college for our kids. Let the ag pundits call us backward and old-fashioned. The soil is healthy, and we are healthy and fulfilled because we work hard doing what farmers are supposed to do. We know a dozen young people who would like to do what we are doing, or think they would, but they can’t afford a piece of land where they can get started. The Dodge commercial is a romantic view of the way things used to be, like the pastoral town Henry Ford built when he was old to escape from the real world of his industrial nightmare.

Anonymous (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

Actually those are Ranchers and Farmers of today. They were photographed in January 2013 in Montana. Get your facts straight before rambling!

K. Holzer (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

W.E.- Please drink some coffee, & wake up. This is Ag today. The world's population thinks it wants cute chickens scratching in the back yard, & Ferdinand the grass-fed steer. But when the dust settles, they want what their wallet allows- affordable, plentiful food. Urban sprawl & the sheer economics of it say those things found at the farmer's market are only possible for the more affluent members of our society, & not the masses. Two thumbs up for the ad, I think Paul was a good choice of voice, & Dodge should put together next year's half time show (PLEASE!).

Harrison (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

W.E.,
I would like to begin by saying that I respect your opinion but would like to clear some things up in regards to your statements. First of all, in the poultry industry there are strict government and industry regulation on the spacing of birds. Also, just like your cattle, if the birds are not comfortable they do not gain weight and the farmer does not stay in business long. The birds are kept cool in the summer by large fans and many houses today are equipped with evaporative cooling cells, which act as a climate control system. The birds are also kept warm in the winter by heaters. The houses contain dry bedding usually consisting of wood shaving. The birds are given food and clean water free choice. The feed usually consists of corn and soybean mill and there are no hormones or steroids allowed in raising chickens. Some houses also are equipped with curtains that can be lowered in good weather to allow in natural light into the houses and there are also lights in the house that can be dimmed at night. If a poultry producer is hauling dead birds out of their house by the dozen there are serious problems. But just as you have probably lost a cow before, chickens die sometimes too. When this happens, the bird is quickly taken from the house to prevent contamination and either buried or incinerated. Also in my time of being around the poultry industry and having seen thousands of birds I have never encountered one who’s chest was so big it could not stand up or had any trouble standing. When the birds are taken to slaughter the houses are cleaned out and the manure is used as a great organic fertilizer for pastures. There is also a long list of regulations and certifications that producers must adhere to. The reason producers go through all of this is because we believe animals have rights too! I believe everyone would like to have free range chickens, but in order for us to continue to feed the world with a safe and affordable food supply these poultry houses are the best and most efficient way to do so. Imagine what the price of chicken would be if it was free range, not to mention the bird’s exposure to predators. Also imagine the price of beef if it was all 100% grass fed. Many Americans are on fixed incomes and just cannot afford that.

W.E. (not verified)
on Feb 6, 2013

Cows didn't evolve eating corn; chickens didn't evolve eating soybean meal; humans didn’t evolve eating grain-fed meat and soy-fed birds. Those are manmade replacements for natural diets. Our substitutions always have multiple consequences. If more farm families were living on the land, supporting themselves by sharing the care of more animals living on pasture, fewer consumers would be entirely dependent upon others for food. Unemployment would be less of a problem. Although no expert on the poultry industry, I do know what I have seen, smelled, sold and bought. No evaporative cooling cells moderate chicken houses here. Hundred-degree summer days will kill a lot of chickens under roof, even if the houses do have fans and good vents. I’ve smelled the incinerator so many times that chicken has no appeal to me. Our local poultry corporation doesn't allow curtains anymore, apparently, and uses rice hulls for bedding; that great organic fertilizer spread weeds like nettle when we bought some for our pastures, leaving a horrific odor that lasted days.
Some young friends of ours in an adjacent state supply an incredible number of their neighbors in two nearby cities with both pastured chicken and eggs from pastured hens. It can be done, where laws allow. Guardian dogs live with and protect their chickens. As they scratch up a balanced natural diet from the pasture, including some green grass and bugs along with their corn, the chickens spread their own manure and that of the cows across the soil behind them, leaving the grass green, lush and more drought resistant. If there were more farmers sharing the work, there would be more caretakers like these energetic young people producing more animals in a way that works with nature as God intended. If more farm animals were living on clean grass every day, our soils would be healthier. Healthier soils in turn make healthier grass, which feeds healthier animals, which make healthier people. The return to quality would trump today's quantity, reducing healthcare costs and making our food more satisfying.
CLA, a fatty acid discovered in 1987 in the meat and milk of grassfed ruminants like cattle, helps reduce obesity, cancers, diabetes and can even reverse atheroschlerosis. As for the cost of grassfed meat, you can pay the farmer or you can pay the hospital. Many Americans pay more for their cell phones than they pay for their groceries. We are not greedy people. Right now, we can make an acceptable profit by charging families $1.50 per pound liveweight for our grassfinished beef--not that much more than the cattle would bring at the local stock yard these days. Customers pay their own processing and transportation costs and handle their beef themselves.
More acres under grass would allow a return to better stewardship, with fewer acres of fragile land subjected to annual rotations of soybeans and corn. More research efforts devoted to perennial crops, pastures and multi-purpose trees would create a more diverse and higher quality food supply.

DisgustedwiththeAD (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

W.E, thank you for telling the REAL Story, Paul Harvey would be Proud. Farming today is mostly industrialized. I didn't see the Migrant workers that work the land that provides food in Mega Grocery Stores across the land. Why weren't they shown? This "Romanticized" vision of Farming of 2013 simply doesn't exist in this country except for the very few. As a commercial, it was made to tug at heartstrings and sell cars not tell the truth. Typical mass manipulation tell product. Show a farm, a soldier, a flag then go sell some product.

Anonymous (not verified)
on Feb 6, 2013

You are just completely ignorant. It kills me to see that people as ignorant as you can actually believe your own words. This was a tribute to the American farmer who today works day and night to feed the growing population of ignorant people like you who would starve without him. Who are you to degrade the farmers who feed you? God bless today's American farmer!!

LDW (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

W.E. - I agree. We need more farmers like you.

chris kinder (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

absolutely wonderful

Val (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

Amen - I couldn't agree with you more. I had a conversation about just this yesterday and how agriculture just needs to enjoy the positive and wide-spread spotlight. The average American is going to have no idea or care that Paul Harvey had animal rights ties later in life.

Ted H. Smith (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

I was watching with a group of about 20 friends so the conversation noise level was a bit louder than the volume on the tv. The commercial was not even audible to our group but as it ran the comments were very favorable, just from the photos. "Don't know what they are selling but I like it," was the consensus without hearing a word. The fact that it was a Dodge made little difference to anyone.

To see the commercial put to words, delivered by Paul Harvey, upped the level of impact ten fold.....really good stuff Dodge.

on Feb 5, 2013

This was a fabulous, tasteful promotion of our industry.......and when Paul Harvey wrote this, he had not regressed to his advocacy positions he took later on in life. We should embrace his message, and use it to our advantage. And give Dodge cudos for an exemplary ad!

Pam Gable (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

Thank you, Amanda, for not losing sight of the big picture with this commercial. The majority of the American public has no idea what farming is about. My husband is a fourth generation dairy farmer and we have three sons, who have always been involved with our farm. I have read that poem many times before and, the last line always brings tears to my eyes. Despite all of the hard work, the long hours and the financial difficulties, all of my sons want to be farmers. I am so proud of them and of my hard-working husband for passing on his love of farming to them.

on Feb 5, 2013

Great article Amanda. I am sure surprised to hear you actually had some negative feedback in regards to the "Farmers" ad. We should celebrate the positive publicity this brings the entire Livestock/Farming industry, rather than look for negatives. Paul Harvey was blessed with a great gift of oratorical skills. Years ago, when I became aware of what I perceived as his "extreme" views, I just changed radio stations in the tractor until his broadcast had ended. I always liked his tribute to "Farmers". Dodge Ram should be applauded for this type ad. My wife tells me that it was a very favorable conversation topic with her "town gal" coworkers at lunch yesterday.

Anonymous (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

Awesome Commercial...one of the best I've seen in a long time!

Anonymous (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

Just read the account in Genesis and after the 7th day, you will see that God created Adam and Eve to tend the Garden of Eden. Interesting!

Allan (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

The commercial was the best I saw all night. It is about time that the american public hears about farming. Everyone should be glad that there are people like us out here. Without farmers there is no food on the shelves or in the resturants. I just whish it would be aired more often.

Kelli Brown (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

Amanda,
Bravo and standing ovation for you. Thank you for this commentary. As a National FFA Officer (years ago), I will never forget returning home from the annual pilgrimage to Japan. My take home message for that trip was simple.....we in agriculture need to speak with ONE VOICE so that the general public can hear the whisper. Instead, we in this industry have a bad carnivorous habit of eating our own. Fast forward twenty five years and the habit is still around. Sunday night I witnessed what has to be the best message (spoken with one voice) to date delivered to an international audience of millions. Come on people....celebrate the fact that Dodge used a recognizable voice to deliver a powerful and moving message! It is past time for all of us to put aside our bickering and commodity partisan agendas and embrace a future together. I'm thankful to be a part of production agriculture and raising boys that want to be a part as well.

Blaine (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

Well said, Kelli Brown! Dodge is promoting "The Year of the Farmer," and that covers many different areas and commodities, as you point out. It is time for us to recognize and embrace our inter-twined and interdependent commonalities and enjoy (and utilize) this celebration of agriculture. Again, well said!

on Feb 5, 2013

Aren't we all animal activist in our own right? We all care for the health and welfare of our animals. No one on our ranch wants to see animals hurt or suffer needlessly. And as for the comment of the photos that should have been more about a cowboy...well we farm and ranch, we are one and the same, farmer, cowboy, rancher...it's production agriculture either way you look at it...and it's a life we love..

Garth (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

agree Amanda this is why in my opinion farmers and ranchers are not a united front squabble,squabble over everything. agriculture was cast in a very positive light in front of millions of people during the superbowl. thank You Dodge very well done

Anonymous (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

What I was bothered by was the unnecessary line about the farmer splinting the broken leg of a meadowlark. That doesn't seem realistic to me....and no farmers I know would do it....even if splinting it would work.

Donald Ferguson (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

Well I've never splinted a birds leg but I have moved baby rabbits to safety when baling hay, same point I suppose.

Denise Lee (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

or trained a border collie to find the fawns before cutting the hay field. I am grateful for our Farmers, Ranchers, etc.

Bob Neese (not verified)
on Feb 5, 2013

Gosh man, it's part of the poem, unedited. Realistic? Perhaps not, but it conveys that we agriculturalists do care about the life and welfare of animals. I'm certainly good with that. And yes, I've mowed around a turkey or quail's nest, and I've got off the tractor, shut down the haybine, and helped a newborn fawn to safety out of the way of the mower. It's obvious that some people can never be pleased or satisfied!

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Amanda Radke

A fifth-generation rancher from Mitchell, SD, Amanda grew up on a purebred Limousin cattle operation in which she and husband Tyler are active. She graduated with a degree in agriculture journalism...

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